Press for Success

Are you a great or not so good client ?

I have worked with various clients and found that some people, most people do NOT know how to obtain media coverage and/or do not even want to do so, and yet, their dilemma is they know that they need TO PROMOTE THEIR BUSINESS OR BOOK. Many business owners and authors are juggling too many balls and cannot find the time nor energy to obtain PR. Or do not know how to write press releases that get published or think that they do not have the skill, talent or creativity to do so. Or they are afraid of the media, and some combination of these makes them avoid, procrastinate and not get the job done.

Some people have unrealistic expectations and want good press but do not think that they have to do anything, that they can just hire someone else to do it for them. If a client does not provide the information, quotes, industry expertise and/or whatever else is needed, even a great publicist cannot do the job flying alone in the wind.

If a publicist sets up an interview and the client does not show up or is ill prepared, the client needs to rethink their priorities and goals for obtaining publicity, to say the least.

A great client knows that they are part of the equation and have a job to do, working with a publicist and do their homework and provide what is needed on their side. Takes two to Tango and Two or more to obtain press.

 

“If the client is able to provide the PR agency with the information they need, they will help them meet their goals. A good client understands that reaching goals takes time, and has patience with the agency while they work. Above all, a good PR client actively participates in their relationship with the agency, helping the two-way street that is public relations run smoothly/”

https://www.bulldogreporter.com/exploring-clientagency-relationships-what-makes-a-good-client-in-public-relations/

 

 

Some tips to maximize press for success

 

Take a calendar and mark down holidays, news, events, and book or movie releases as inspiration to create press releases that relate to your company.

Regularly speak as the expert on your topic at conferences, workshops, events and colleges, business groups, and wow the audiences with your tips, knowledge and entertaining but informative talks.

Build and develop a relationships with reporters,editors, and writers who will write about you and your company, product or service,  book, whatever you are promoting, if and when YOU GIVE THEM CONSISTENTLY WHAT THEY WANT.

Give back to your community with charitable donations and sponsor events, art foundations, sports teams, booster clubs, groups and camps.

Host book signing events, movie nights, holiday themed parties, charity events, scavenger hunts, barbecues, bakeoffs, cake sales, pizza nights, wine or beer tastings, weddings,anniversaries,flash or cash mobs,or whatever is appropriate and fun and will attract new customers and the press.

Be round, square, or diamond-shaped… in other words, STAND OUT FROM THE CROWD.

Work with your publicist and give them whatever they need to GET THE JOB DONE FOR YOU.

 

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DARE TO BE DIFFERENT, INNOVATIVE, CREATIVE

Johnny Cupcakes sells t-shirts in shops that look and smell like bakery shops

“A food themed clothing brand was weird to many people, but weird is good! It gets people talking. I started making more Johnny Cupcakes t-shirts that poked fun of pop culture, replacing known references with cupcakes. One particular logo, the one most identifiable with Johnny Cupcakes today is a cupcake with crossbones. Guy’s thought it was funny and girls thought it was cute. The design caused curiosity and conversation amongst strangers. More than anything, it made people smile.

“When it came time to open a store, I really wanted it to be an unforgettable experience. My dad and I transformed my first store location into an old fashioned bakery where I displayed t-shirts in vintage, industrial refrigerators and on baking racks. I even made it smell like frosting! This is and always has been the model for all of my stores. Even when you purchase a t-shirt, we package them in our signature pastry boxes.

“I’ve always taken my advertising budget and put it into building unique experiences through our products, packaging, events, and retail environments. By doing this, people end up doing the advertising for us through word of mouth. Through the unique nature of the brand, we’ve been featured in press outlets that I would have never imagined in my life!”

 

http://kitchen.johnnycupcakes.com/story/

 

 

Let’s discuss your publicity needs TODAY. Call me at 702-225-8206 or email me at

prmatchmaker at yahoo.com.

 

NOW, you’ve MET your PR MATCHMAKER… LET’S GET SOME PRESS FOR YOUR SUCCESS.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Rules for Publicity: Do not ask these 7 questions

If you ever want to obtain media coverage, you would be wise to follow the advice below from a PR pro who knows what she is talking about. Since I have been on both sides of this, as a PR pro and a newspaper reporter, I know that this is true. If someone asks questions like these, they are likely to NOT only NOT get any media coverage but will likely be put on a NO FLY list. Busy reporters / editors do not have time with busy deadlines ALWAYS looming on their horizons to deal with people who clearly do NOT know the RULES of the road to PUBLICITY.

Even this dog says NO:

 

As a PR pro who’s been at this a while, I can tell you it’s no secret that there are some things those in our profession do that completely turn reporters off. Yes, reporters can get cranky with us—but sometimes, if we’re honest with ourselves, we deserve it.

While everyone makes mistakes, it’s always better if we can learn from the experience of others so that we might avoid the same missteps.

With that in mind, here are some of the questions reporters DON’T want to hear:

1. Did you get my email?

It’s safe to assume that, unless your message bounced back to you, the reporter did receive your message. So, don’t ask this question. Rather, if you want to follow up, it’s better to phrase it more like, “I’m following up re: X—please let me know should you have any questions or need anything further.”

2. Something came up—can we reschedule our meeting/call?

The answer is – no.

You were lucky to get a meeting in the first place, so the last thing you want to do is to ask to reschedule. Reporters are busy—and their time is extremely valuable—so do whatever you must to make it work. Just make sure your client is there, on time and ready to go.

3. Can we review the story before it goes to print?

Again, no. This isn’t the way PR works.

If you want control over the content, buy an ad. With PR, the story is in the reporter’s hands. If you—or your client—are nervous about what the story might say, remember that journalists are trained to write news pieces and that they have editors to review their work.

4. Will you publish the press release exactly as it reads?

The press release is information you provide so that a reporter can write his or her own story. If they print it verbatim, congratulations—you’ve hit the jackpot. However, this isn’t the norm. You should expect the reporter to write a story based on the information you’ve provided. What the story may say is not up to you (see #3).

5. Can you wait for us to get you that customer reference/product sample/image you requested?

No—no, they can’t. If a reporter has asked for something, drop everything and do your best to get it to him or her—fast.

Media opportunities should take priority over almost anything else you’re doing. In fact, you should be ready to provide what they need before they even ask for it. Anticipate what they may want and prepare it in advance. That way, it’s easy to shoot over that additional piece of information quickly, if it’s requested.

6. Can you use this previously published material?

Generally, no. They want fresh material, especially if you’re writing a contributed article. Don’t try to pass off something that’s already been published, unless you’ve made significant changes—or unless you’ve made it crystal clear that this has already been published elsewhere.

7. Can you get back to me by Tuesday? Otherwise, I’ll assume you’re not interested.

This sounds more like a threat than a deadline—and generally speaking, reporters set the deadlines for us (and their editors set the deadlines for them)—not the other way around. If a reporter is interested, it’s safe to assume he or she will respond when ready. Many times, if they like a story pitch, it will be sooner rather than later. But, it’s important to remember, they set the timeframe.

So, try to avoid asking reporters these questions to get a little further toward building a relationship based on trust and respect with your media contacts. Be the kind of PR pro they look forward to hearing from.

Michelle Messenger Garrett is a public relations consultant, speaker and award-winning writer with more than 20 years of agency, corporate, startup and Silicon Valley experience. She works with clients ranging from small businesses to enterprises such as Adobe and HP, assisting them in crafting and carrying out a PR strategy to help them get the word out, get noticed and increase visibility, prospects and sales.

Book Magic

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Fairy godmother or not, are you suffering from obscurity? If so, you’re not alone. Thousands of people are invisible. Thousands of people hide their gifts and talents and business behind jargon, boring copy, and hard to read press releases and website copy. No one understands their products / services. No one cares. In a busy market place, they are busy getting ignored. Their products stay on the shelf gathering dust.

Thousands of people have self-esteem issues. If you don’t do anything about it, so what. No one will buy your products / service. Your business will fail.  You will become a statistic. Half of all businesses fail during the first five years, according to the Small Business Administration.

Ever watch those shows on TV, Restaurant Impossible and others? Many business owners do not promote their business and what happens? Nothing.

You will be a perennial wallflower, the person who cannot succeed, always gets passed over for promotions, the person who never finds their soul mate, the person who never publishes the book that they know that they were born to write. The person who wishes, hopes and yearns for something more out of life but never fulfills their dreams of Getting Published. The person who spends their life waiting for their Fairy Godmother to DO something. Or for Some Day (the day between Sunday and Monday).

We can help you go from obscurity to limelight by getting your business the media coverage you deserve. A few articles in local and national publications can get those widgets flying off the shelf in no time.

We can assist you in writing that book and getting it published. And maybe even fulfill some other dreams.

For a 15-minute complementary consultation to discuss your business needs and/or book project contact 702-225-8206.

We provide:

  • Book editing
  • Ghostwriting
  • Book proposals
  • Manuscript evaluation
  • Help finding literary agents and publishers
  • Self-publishing
  • Book Publicity/Promotion
  • Classes, Events, Seminars, Workshop Promotion
  • and more

If you wanna dance with me… Contact me at 702-225-8206 for a 15 minute complementary call to discuss your Book Project.  It could be just the MAGIC you need!

Media coverage 101

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Everyone has a story, something to say.  Your press/news release begins with a story that has a beginning, middle and end. It tells a tale. And makes your audience want to know more about your product, service, company.

 

Is your story newsworthy?

 

will it lure the media into calling you to do an interview?

 

do you know how to tell your story (or your company’s) so that it is newsworthy and will capture the media’s attention (and you end up with interviews, feature stories and reviews)?

 

are you giving advice, tips, value to your audience?

 

do you know who your audience is specifically?

 

is your story a heart warming tale, entertaining and/or practical?

 

can you write a headline that tells your story 1-2-3?

 

do your website and press materials provide the best contacts and are they reachable 24/7?

 

The most successful news releases provide stories that people can relate to and offer the info the media wants (are newsworthy).

 

Let me take a look at your news release and I will let you know if your press release has all the elements it needs to obtain the media coverage you say you want. Call me at 702-226-8206 or email me at pr matchmaker at yahoo. com

 

 

Hook your audience

 

Good reminder from John Kremer about how to write a press release that gets the job done (to obtain media coverage) because it is newsworthy as opposed to one that is not. If your first sentence leads to snoozing, then it’s a loser. If it makes the media sit up and read, then it’s a winner. Simple, easy as pie, 1-2-3.

 

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Newsworthy Leads Make a Difference

 

As a former journalist, I certainly knew how to write a press release for my first book. The press release said something like, “A new book about how to attract volunteers is published.”

The response? ZERO. Zippo. Nada.

Discouraged, I went to the library where I read in the Washington Post that Congress was considering a 4.2 billion dollar cut in funds for education. I then re-sent the exact same press release, adding
one sentence at the beginning:

 

“With Congress considering a 4.2 billion dollar cut in funds for education, a book about how to attract volunteers could become a survival manual for American schools.”

The response? 31 talk-show bookings.

The book, To Lead Is to Serve – How to Attract Volunteers & Keep Them, has become an evergreen bestseller and was quoted on television by President George Bush. It also led to more books and a successful speaking career on the topics of nonprofit leadership, fundraising, and leadership for women.

All of this because I added one newsworthy sentence to a press release.

— Shar McBee, author of To Lead Is to Serve – How to Attract Volunteers & Keep Them

Web: http://www.joyofleadership.com

 

http://askthepublicist.com/newsworthy-leads-make-a-difference/